Fitness Focus
Contact UsRegister
Fitness Focus Saskatoon - Latest News
Gym & CardioGroup FitnessPersonal TrainingServicesPricesAbout Us

Quick Links

Are We a Part of Your Social Media Feed?

posted by Fitness Focus    |   August 31, 2016 16:08

You need to stay connected with your gym! You have all those social media apps on your phone and you're on them all day; why not add us to your network? When we have member exclusive promotions, contests, giveaways, updates, events or happenings around the club; you need to stay informed and there's no better way. 

Saskatoon Fitness Gym Social Media Fitness FocusSNAPCHAT: fitnessfocus.sk

Saskatoon Fitness Gym Social Media Instagram Fitness FocusINSTAGRAM: @fitnessfocussaskatoon

Saskatoon Fitness Gym Social Media Facebook Fitness FocusFACEBOOK: Fitness Focus

Saskatoon Fitness Gym Social Media Twitter Fitness FocusTWITTER: fitnessfocusgym

Saskatoon Fitness Gym Social Media Pinterest Fitness FocusPINTEREST: Fitness Focus

Help Stuff the Bus with Rock 102 for the Saskatoon Food Bank & Learning Centre

posted by Fitness Focus    |   November 17, 2015 13:33
Calling all Gym Members! Help Stuff the Bus with Rock 102 for the Saskatoon Food Bank & Learning Centre.

There's a nice big donation bin here at the front desk at Fitness Focus; between now and December 10th we're collecting donations for the Rock 102 Stuff the Bus campaign. While Food Bank usage is down across the province, it has risen in some areas, such as Saskatoon in 2015; it doesn't take much time or money to help out those in need.
Most wanted food items include:
- Whole Grain Cereals
- Infant Formula
- Hearty Soups & Stews
- Whole Grain Pastas
- 100% Real Fruit Juice
- Canned Beans & Protien
- Canned Vegetables

Saskatoon Gyms Fitness Focus Food Bank

Trusted Saskatoon Presents Talk to the Experts on Newstalk 650 Saskatoon

posted by Fitness Focus    |   December 18, 2012 12:26

This latest show we are featuring is the TRUSTED SASKATOON  HEALTH & BEAUTY SHOW

On December 15, 2012, Newstalk 650 Radio and Trustedsaskatoon.com presented to you, Talk to the Experts with 3 local Trustedsaskatoon.com businesses, Spa Ahava, Hairstyle Inn and Fitness Focus. The 3 experts on the panel were answering questions asked by the trustedsaskatoon.com fans on the topics of beauty, health and fitness.  All of the Trusted Facebook Fans who entered a question had a chance to win a prize package from the 3 Trusted Businesses worth over $500 as host, Brent Louks chooses the best question!

This episode's' Trusted Saskatoon Experton the topic of fitness is Garret from Fitness Focus a Trusted Saskatoon Gym There were over 100 questions submited and the 3 partners will answer all the questions in later trustedsaskatoon.com blogs..so If your didn't hear you answer on the show they will still be answered by the experts...enjoy!

Click here to check out the full show

 

1. Becky Laliberté - In terms if fitness and health, what are some ways for an almost 40 year old woman to help improve flexibility and strength without having to spend hours at a gym. Are there instructor led classes that might be better for this? Or is weight lifting and stretching enough?

Stretching is always a good thing to practice for your overall health and to prevent injuries in day to day activities. Stretching is incorporated into every group fitness class but is also something you should learn to do on your own.  For such a vital part of ones wellness, the benefits are well worth the time spent; and it really only takes 10 to 20 minutes to get a good thorough stretch. Remember, it’s something you can do at home too; either in the morning before you start your day or in the evening to help unwind and relax.

It is recommended to stretch after a light warm up, before you begin your workout; but stretching throughout your workout between exercises can be very beneficial and time saving.  As blood gets pumped into your muscles as you use them, a good stretch will help push the blood out and make way for fresh oxygenated blood. You can also improve your flexibility by weight training with proper (full) range of motion through the exercise.

 

2. Laura Ellis- Fitness Focus: As a female who is not an avid "gym rat", I find the gym can be an intimidating place. Insecurities about not being in as good of shape as I would like to be to start tend to keep me away, along with all of the new types of equipment and my lack of knowledge in using them. I tend to feel lost in the midst of everything. Short of personal training, what do you recommend for someone who wants to get in better shape, but is reluctant to take on a gym membership?

It’s important to remember that everyone is at the gym for the same reason, because they want to improve themselves in one way or another.  One way to overcome the intimidation factor is to have a workout partner, everyone feels better when they have a friend with them. Having a workout partner is also a good way to stay on track and accountable, to make sure you show up on time for your workout everyday.  You may also feel a little less intimidated if you choose a workout time when the gym is a little less busy.  The majority of people try to get their workout done immediately after work around 4:30 – 6:30.  If you prefer the gym to be on the quiet side try to avoid these busier times, at least until you’ve become more acquainted with the equipment.

 

Your health does take a certain degree of dedication, but before committing yourself and your money to a gym, take the gym for a test drive.  Look for a facility that won’t pressure you and that offers a free-trial period that’s yours to test the waters, find your comfort zone and see if it has all the amenities that meet your needs.  A trial period is the perfect time to ask questions about equipment and get familiarized with the gym; staff should always be willing to give you some direction to get started out in the weight room.

 

3. Neils Thor- Fitness Focus-I use interval training to keep in shape. What other methods maximize my time to keep fit?

The idea behind interval training is to keep it is fast paced.  This same principle can be applied to a traditional style of weight training by increasing the intensity.  Lower the rest time between exercises will keep the heart rate up, thus working your cardiovascular system.

 

4. Holly Stasiuk Fitness Focus- Please explain what is a spin class? Costs? Also, how much does a personal trainer cost?

Spin Class is an instructor-led group class on stationary bikes.  The instructor takes the group through a 45 minute to one hour workout at varying paces and difficulties.  It’s a very thorough workout and great class for anyone from beginners to experienced class-goers because the user chooses their own difficulty on their bike.

 

5. DeAnne Robblee-  Fitness Focus: I have arthritis in one knee which makes squats, running and even walking very difficult sometimes. What kind of equipment do you have that I could still get a good cardio workout without killing my knee?

When it comes to arthritis and some of the major movements such as squats, progression is the best way to go.  Start doing the exercises with virtually no resistance/weight. For cardio, keep things very low impact.  Stationary bikes are one of your best options, we have upright style and the recumbent (laid back) style, as well as spin bikes. We have elliptical cross-trainers are a close simulation to running combined with skiing and have very low impact.  There are also steppers that don’t involve much impact; a person would have to try to see if that would work for them.

 

6. Fanterra Fisher- What kind of training is required by your staff to have to work at the spa? Please comment on standards of cleanliness as well. Thanks

There are several different areas of expertise at Fitness Focus that all have their own required skills. Most importantly, all staff is CPR and First Aid Certified.  Main Gym Staff are knowledgeable about the layout and mechanics of the gym to make your time here as convenient as possible.  Personal Trainers and Group Fitness Instructors have years of experience with proper certifications and insurance in their respective fields.

 

Cleanliness is a very important part of the gym; a dirty environment can dramatically affect a member’s experience. All staff takes part in our daily cleaning routines of the exercise areas, front end and washrooms.  There are several hand sanitizing stations for members to use. We also have after hour cleaners working to sanitize the washrooms and commons areas from top to bottom.

 

7. Kimbrolina Linke -Fitness focus: what are your memberships?

Details about different membership types and prices are all available on the website (www.fitnessfocus.ca).  Membership types are very flexible and you can set a membership up either on a biweekly payment plan with No Contract, or purchase a term membership.

 

8. Jessalyn Monette - As a Saskatonian I am always looking for the best places that will give me the best results. For the three trusted Health and Beauty Partners what makes your establishment unique to Saskatoon?  I am someone who not only looks for good quality, but I want to ensure my money is spent on a good experience, atmosphere and creativity. Does your establishment offer these qualities?

In an industry that is becoming dominated by corporate gyms, we feel that as a locally owned fitness facility we hold many of the same values and standards as our members. We understand the importance of a comfortable and friendly gym setting, and that keeping a mature and positive atmosphere is vital to creating that. Our success is only possible through the success of our members which is a direct result of their positive experience.

Our approach is a little different than the traditional fitness centre in that we operate without contracts.  This sets us apart because our members can rest assured that we are working our hardest everyday to meet all their wants and needs.

 

 

9. Ann Lyte-Maille- fitness focus, is there a time of day that is best to exercise? Or is just good to try when you can?

Everybody is different; some people function well early in the morning whereas others are on their game later in the day.  There are certain benefits to planning a workout at a specific time of day.  For morning workouts you might find you have better longevity throughout the rest of your day.  A morning workout will also boost your metabolism, this will help regulate (steady) your appetite for the day which aids weight management.  On the other hand, a workout later in the day is a good chance to burn off some excess calories before bed or relieve stress from a long day.  Many of us tend to binge eat later in the day; occupying your time in the evening with a workout is a good way to eliminate those habits.  Ultimately the best time of day to workout is when you personally will have the most drive, energy and focus.

 

National Health & Fitness Day Act

posted by Fitness Focus    |   December 9, 2012 15:48

It was recently announced that MP John Weston of West Vancouver introduced a private memberís bill to establish a National Health and Fitness Day. The bill encourages local governments to open the doors of their facilities on a complementary basis on the first Saturday of June each year. This act hopes to benefit Canadians by encouraging participation in healthy physical activities at a time when obesity-related conditions such as diabetes are taking an increasing toll on our health and economy.

National Health and Fitness Day Saskatoon

This September, Statistics Canada reported that 31.5 per cent of Canadians between ages five and 17 are over-weight or obese. Weston makes it very clear in his statement that he is NOT proposing to create a National Skinny Day. He wants to create a day which revolves around educating Canadians, young and old, about the importance of staying fit through physical activity.  In turn, this Bill will encourage individuals of all demographics to participate in physical activity in order lead a healthier lifestyle.

 Weston has the support of all four parties represented in the House of Commons. Two MPs, the NDPís Peter Stoffer of Nova Scotia and Liberal Kirsty Duncan of Ontario, have publicly endorsed Westonís initiative. With the assistance of the fitness industry, this Bill has a high potential of passing. Currently, many fitness facilities have also shown their support towards hosting National Health and Fitness Day. Some clubs who have already shown their support include, Curves (national), Cambridge Group of Clubs (Ontario) and Fitness Focus (Saskatoon). We are hoping that we can get as many fitness facilities and clubs on board as possible to promote this initiative.

The Anti-Aging Agents of Exercise and Weight Training

posted by Fitness Focus    |   October 2, 2012 23:00

Questions from around the gym: Working out helps me shape and tone my body, what are some of the health benefits of weight training?

The Anti-Aging Agents of Exercise and Weight Training

By the time you finish reading this article, you, like every other person alive on the planet, will have gotten a bit older. From the moment we are born, we begin to mature but naturally, we don’t really pay any attention to getting older until we start actually seeing and feeling all the tangible signs of the passage of time on our body. We are living longer than ever before mostly due to advances in medical technology and improvements in living conditions.  In fact, by the year 2030, there will be over double the amount of North Americans over the age of 65 than in the year 2000. Unfortunately, we have been  influenced once again into viewing the aging process as an illness that we must treat and reversed.  Increased body fat, significant loss of muscle mass and strength to the point of infirmity in addition to the slew of age associated conditions such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, hypertension and osteoporosis are erroneously seen as an inevitable consequence of growing older. However, studies of older individuals who regularly engaged in weight training and bodybuilding have always challenged the idea that such infirmities come more as a self-fulfilling prophecy as a result of inactivity and poor dietary choices than a fate that we are all destined to suffer.  This article is going to take a look at the physiological aspect of aging and how weight training and exercise can create what gerontologists nowadays refer to as successful aging; basically getting older with a low probability of disease or physical disability, maintaining high cognitive and physical function and having an active engagement with life in later years.

Understanding The Mechanisms Of Aging
Start by understanding just how exactly does aging occur. It is easy to recognize the results of aging, however there are certain biological mechanisms at work that we are often unaware of. The number cells that make up our body are kept at a relatively steady number through the process of mitosis (remember back to hisgh school biology, cells dividing) typically even with the number of cells that are dying. This balance is know as homeostasis, and it is utterly necessary for optimal health and body function however this equilibrium cannot be maintained indefinitely.  In what is called the Hayflick limit, all animal cells have a limited number of times that they can reproduce. As we get older, senescence sets in- which is a decline in the ability of our bodies’ cells to divide. This usually starts in our early thirties and continues on throughout our lives. One prevailing theory is that the everyday occurrence of cellular reproduction leads to cumulative damage to our DNA and cells begin to die or not function correctly. This process, called apoptosis is actually beneficial as it acts a way of ‘cleaning up’ that benefits the healthy remaining cells. Taken as a whole, aging thus is nothing more than our bodies decline in being able to deal with stress. Maintaining homeostasis becomes more and more difficult until a point is reached where the organism dies.

The Role Of Weight Training In The Prevention of Muscle Wasting

 Building muscle however through the use of a well executed weight training program of sufficient intensity is a way of increasing our bodies’ potential response to stress. As we get older, one of the main aspects working against us from being as strong and as built as we were in our younger years is sarcopenia. Sarcopenia which means literally ‘poverty of the flesh’, refers to the loss of skeletal  muscle mass that comes with aging which in turn leads to weakness and frailty. For the average member of the population, as much as 50% of your skeletal muscle mass is lost between the ages of 20 and 90 years resulting in in a corresponding reduction in muscular strength. Such loss of muscle mass is usually associated as well with an increase in overall body fat. However as normal an occurrence this might be for most of us, studies suggest that lack of exercise- or more specifically weight bearing resistance exercise (like weight training) may be one of the overriding causes of sacropenia.

We don’t have to lose such large amounts of muscle mass as we age, but without an active lifestyle that incorporates some form of resistance exercise over the course of time our bodies will indeed fall victim to the syndrome of ‘use it or lose it.’ While it would be absurd to think that weight training can allow you to be strong and muscular as you were in your twenties, preliminary research shows that those who engage in intense weight training over the course of their lifetime are able to demonstrate physical qualities and abilities on par with if not exceeding that of untrained individuals in their twenties while well into their fifth decade of life. With most of our medical anti-aging focus resting on the shoulders of pharmaceutical companies trying to find a pill form solution to the combat the effects of the march of time, comparatively little is invested in researching protocols that are far less potentially lucrative such as weight training. Nevertheless, short term studies thus far do indeed show that resistance exercises like weight training increase the ability of our muscles to synthesize proteins and thus minimizing the advent of skeletal muscle decline over the years.

Getting Older- A Detailed Look At The Physiology

As we get older, it is not only our muscles that get significantly weaker without physical activity but also our bones. Increased bone porosity and reduction in bone mass can lead to the debilitating effects of osteoporosis. Which as we know can be both reversed and prevented by the implementation of weight bearing activities such as weight training. There are some aspects however that are beyond our control, as with the advancing years comes a natural decrease in the speed of nerve conduction, reduction in peak cardiovascular ability as well as a decline in kidney and other organ function. As mentioned earlier in an explanation of the Hayflick limit, our cells have a limited number of reproductions; and as you get older the motor units (motoneurons) in your fast twitch muscles begin to die. You don’t immediately notice it, as our bodies have a remarkable system of compensating. Consider that a muscles in  your leg may have 250 motor units with each motor unit having as many as a thousand muscle fibers under its control.

This ratio of motor units to muscle fiber is known as an innervation ratio and in this case would be 1,000 muscle fibers per motoneuron.
Over the course of time, those 250 motor units in your leg muscle may drop by as much as half to 125 by the time you are 70 years old, and you would think that this would make you only half as strong, but it isn’t that straightforward. You see, we lose muscle fibers at a much slower rate than motor units so you would have only lost 10% of the muscle fiber in that leg muscle by the age of 70. However, the remaining 125 motor units sprout new branches to the muscle fibers that have lost their motor units to activate them and do more work than they did before. As a result, there is a higher innervation ratio, in this example it would be let us say 1,500 muscle fibers per motoneuron as our motor units take control of more muscle fibers as a way of helping us retain our strength as we get older.

Our nervous system also slows with the passage of time and so the mechanisms of muscle contraction slows down as well. Despite these natural declines, regular resistance type exercise and an overall active lifestyle can help minimize and offset the effect of these changes in our bodies. The more muscle mass built up over time, the more strength, coordination and motor skills you will have as you get older. A point lost sadly on the millions of women who invest most of their time pursuing aerobic type exercises and lower impact activities like yoga out of a misplaced fear of developing man-sized muscles and thus curtail their involvement in weight training- the very exercises that will help them stay looking and feeling younger as the years go by.  

Hormone Replacement Isn’t Always The Answer
Our hormones also play a role in the reduction of our muscle mass as we get older. Testosterone, growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor (IGF) help our bodies’ build and maintain muscle mass but there is a marked reduction in production as we get older. High intensity weight training has been shown to increase all three hormones naturally and within standard human parameters. It might sound like a good idea to forgo weight training and instead turn to hormone replacement therapies but research shows that this reduction in hormones may be a key mechanism that allows us to live longer. Mammalian models with reduced growth hormone (GH) and/or IGF-1 appear to live longer and while the administration of testosterone replacement therapy for men has become a lucrative and fast growing industry here in the United States, presently available data do not justify the broad use of such hormones for anti-aging purposes.

Effects Of A Lifetime Of Weight Lifting On the Aging Process

While it is established that there is a natural decline in our bodies from the age of 30 or so due to the processes mentioned above- there are also many examples of individuals who defy the narrative of decline for far longer than one would expect. In 1987, Dr. Fredrick Hatfield- (or Dr. Squat as he is affectionately known) set a world powerlifting record squatting over 1,000 lbs at the age of 45- more than any human being in history had ever successfully lifted in competition. A feat he was able to continue well into his fifties. My good friend and natural bodybuilder Kenny Hall started competing in his twenties and kept on winning titles for the next half a century. His greatest accomplishment was winning the Pro Mr. America in 1969 but he maintained a level of muscle mass and definition that allowed him to easily best other competitors decades younger than he was until he retired in his 70’s so that others would have their chance to win as well.

The science of Gerontology has only just started to pay attention to the amazing examples set by those engaged in a lifetime of weight training and drug free bodybuilding and research reveals that involvement in such activities can ‘create possibilities for people to age positively and reconstruct what aging “normally” means.” Such studies also highlight the self fulfilling prophecy that our society’s acceptance of advancing age as a time of disengagement, dysfunction and disease goes a long way in our not taking action to prevent it from being just that.  As long as we see aging as a downward trajectory of physical and mental deterioration, we are doomed to experience it as such. One of the common perspectives of men and women involved in weight training activities over the course of their lives and who exhibit remarkable physicality into the later sixth decades of life is what was termed a ‘mondadic styled’ body. In short, they focused on who they were and what they were doing as opposed to being influenced by what society expected them to be or the examples of their peers whose aging process tended to follow the narrative of decline that we are so used to hearing. Without turning to hormonal solutions that can often cause more problems than they solve, these individuals centered themselves on following a lifestyle. A lifestyle that allows them to significantly offset the impact of aging and achieve what we are all looking for- twilight years that aren’t defined by disease and disability but by engagement with life on all levels. We don’t need drugs or DeLeon’s fabled fountain of youth, we just need to make certain forms of exercise a part of our lives at all times.

Beyond The Weight Room — Melissa Leier At Nationals

posted by Fitness Focus    |   September 17, 2012 00:08

Beyond The Weight Room — Melissa Leier At Nationals

After winning Saskatchewan Figure Provincials (see excerpts from my journal in the May issue of Saskatoon Well Being Magazine), I went right into contest preparation for Canadian Nationals four months later. As I start this journal, it’s two days to show time. During the last few days leading up to the competition, I really have to make the best use of my time, at home, in the gym and in my leisure time. Oh wait! There isn’t any leisure time at this point!

 

This time around I have the opportunity to compete at the same show as my boyfriend, Chris! We’ve each done our share of competitions in the past and supported each other through a few, but this was the first one we both were able to do together. Not only am I lucky to have him along with me to help me out with my suit, competition colour, motivation and support, but I also am extremely excited for him to compete in the Men’s Physique category and I can’t wait to see how he does. There’s no doubt in my mind that he’s going to rock it on stage!

Read more about Melissa at Well Being Magazine

Saskatoon Well Being: Our Favorite Article for September

posted by Fitness Focus    |   September 7, 2012 17:37

Here is our favorite article chosen from the September 2012 issue of Saskatoon Wellbeing Magazine.  This month's article is about sleep.  Most of us take this luxury for granted; we don't realize how important a good night sleep really is to what we do the following day.  It can affect your work, relationships with people and even be the deciding factor of whether to make it to the gym or not.  This article touches base on a side of sleep deprivation we might not be acknowledging.

Sleeping Separately: Why More Couples Are Going To Sleep In Different Beds

by Sarah Stefanson

She needs complete silence to get to sleep. He likes the white noise of a fan in the background. The fan also keeps him cool, but she likes to be nice and warm. She needs darkness and he can fall asleep in a fully lit room. He tends to go to sleep early and wake up early, while she’s just the opposite. He twitches in his sleep. Oh, and he snores.

They have tried different tactics to solve their sleep differences. She sings the praises of her sleep mask. They tried having different blankets for each of them. Schedule adjustments. Earplugs. No matter what they attempted, the glaring truth was staring them in the face: they were not meant to sleep in the same room.

Many couples are experiencing similar dilemmas and most are hesitant to resort to separate bedrooms, but it is a growing trend for partners to split up at bedtime. From 2001 to 2005, the National Sleep Foundation found that the numbers of American married couples that sleep in separate beds rose from 12 per cent to 23 per cent. The Sleep Council of England reports that 1 in 4 Brits habitually spend their nights in spare rooms or on sofas. Want more proof? The National Association of Home Builders says there have been more and more requests for homes built with two master bedrooms. In fact, they estimate that by the year 2015, 60 per cent of all custom-built homes will have his and hers bedrooms.

Proponents of separate bedrooms have several good arguments to back them up and even some scientific evidence.

Sleep specialist Dr. Neil Stanley revealed at the British Science Festival in 2009 that couples that sleep in the same bed may experience 50 per cent more sleep disturbances than those who sleep separately

Meet the Personal Trainers: Chris Pylypchuk

posted by Fitness Focus    |   August 2, 2012 13:44

Meet the Personal Trainers: Chris Pylypchuk

 

Chris has always had a passion for Fitness and Sport and has participated avidly in both since high school. Along with many other competitive childhood sports, Chris spent time wrestling and playing football.  In 2003 he entered in his first bodybuilding competition in the Saskatchewan Amateur Bodybuilding Association.  He feels fortunate to be able to share this passion with clients and friends at Fitness Focus and is proud but stays humble in contributing to their success. Chris believes firmly that it is important to practice what you preach; as such he is not just a Personal Trainer but also a competitive fitness athlete. Chris’ goal as your trainer is to be %100 honest with you about where you are, about your progress, where you want to be, and in your Client/Trainer-relationship. He continues to constantly educate himself to improve his ability to provide you with the latest and most effective techniques to help you achieve your goals, ultimately making him a better trainer. Chris’ mission is not only to help you condition your body but also your mind, to make his teaching something you can live with, enjoy and incorporate into your life.

 Qualifications:

  • Can-Fit-Pro Certified Personal Trainer Specialist
  • WBFF Pro Fitness Model
  • B.Sc Biochemistry University of Saskatchewan

Chris specializes in One on One Personal Training, Customized Fitness and Diet Plans, Weight Management and Contest Preparation.

If you would like to contact Chris you can email to chris@teamwawryk.com or go to www.teamwawryk.com

Meet The Personal Trainers: Jamie Polson

posted by Fitness Focus    |   August 1, 2012 12:19

Meet the Personal Trainers: Jamie Polson.

Jamie's interest in health and fitness began as a young teenager.  He has devoted many hours and energy to improving his overall health, wellness and physique; and takes pride in sharing his knowledge with his friends and clients to help them achieve their goals and enjoy life. Jamie is very serious about train; not only his own training, but those who he trains as well.  He has a respect for hard work and believe if a person is going to embark on a path towards a goal it should be done right, without cutting corners and honestly.  Over the course of 25 years, he has amassed the experience along with certifications in fitness and nutrition.  From beginner to a well seasoned weight lifter, Jamie has the tools to help you exceed your weight management goals.

Jamie specializes in Individual Dietary Plans, Customized Fitness and Workout Programs, Weight Management and Lean Muscle Tissue Growth.  His qualifications include: Fitness and Nutrition Diploma and over 25 years in health and fitness 

You can contact Jamie directly by email at jamie@teamwawryk.com

Meet The Personal Trainers: Tammie Teneycke

posted by Fitness Focus    |   July 21, 2012 19:19

Tammie Teneycke

As the owner of Fitness Focus in Saskatoon and member of Team Warwyk Personal Training, Tammie has over 20 years of experience in the gym and is not slowing down anytime soon. Through all the years of training she has become a master of weight management. What Tammie enjoys most about personal training is her interaction with her clients; sharing her successes and failures, and allowing her clients to reach their goals by sharing her experiences. She is passionate about constantly continuing to educate herself in the never ending knowledge that is health and wellness which in turn makes her a better trainer. Tammie says "My Passion for personal training is an important part of my day to day living. Having the drive to compete several times at National levels in figure has given me the experience and charisma that allows me to be a beter trainer for my clients."

Tammie is also a very involved group fitness instructor, her favorite classes to teach are TRX, Spin and Fusion.

Tammie's qualifications and experience include:
 B.C.R.A. Certification in personal training. Can-Fit-Pro Fusion Specialist, Recreation and Leisure Management, Twist Conditioning Coach, TRX & Bosu Certifications, and Helen Vanderberg Pilates Infused Core.

For more information, inquiries or to book with a trainer please contact us at the gym at (306) 244-6413

Fitness Focus is Saskatoon's No Contract Gym

Join Fitness Focus Online
Fitness Focus Juice Bar